Teaching Global Sounds and Arts

Ask me anything   A teaching tumblr for classes I teach in Music (popular, world, classical) and Comparative Arts. If you are a current or former student, I probably won't follow you back unless you explicitly request it.

twitter.com/kgoldschmitt:

    tigerfeel:


edencomplex:


phantomeus:


phantomeus:


edencomplex:


Persephone turning Ascalaphus into an Owl 
Son of Acheron (the river of pain) and Orphne (an underworld nymph), Askalaphos was the orchardist of Hades. He told the other gods that Persephone had eaten a pomegranate in Hades.
He was punished by being changed into an owl. After being transformed into a screech owl, he became the familiar bird of Hades, King of the Underworld.








OMFG I WAS WONDERING WHY THIS WAS GETTING SO MANY NOTES


jESUSU FUCK

    tigerfeel:

    edencomplex:

    phantomeus:

    phantomeus:

    edencomplex:

    Persephone turning Ascalaphus into an Owl 

    Son of Acheron (the river of pain) and Orphne (an underworld nymph), Askalaphos was the orchardist of Hades. He told the other gods that Persephone had eaten a pomegranate in Hades.

    He was punished by being changed into an owl. After being transformed into a screech owl, he became the familiar bird of Hades, King of the Underworld.

    image

    image

    OMFG I WAS WONDERING WHY THIS WAS GETTING SO MANY NOTES

    jESUSU FUCK

    (via gguillotte)

    — 1 month ago with 5729 notes
    #stuff i should teach  #persephone  #ascalaphus 
    A Slob's Guide to Critical Theory | VICE United States →

    For all of the theory heads out there… Happy finals!

    — 4 months ago
    Part of a series of final projects for Ringling College of Art + Design.
First-year Illustration major Saige Libertore was especially impressed with Romantic Gothicism in Arts in Context, especially that expressed in Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “Christabel.” This demonic tale of seduction told in verse features two female characters, the protagonist Christabel and the mysterious Geraldine. As you can see in Saige’s illustration, Geraldine is figured as the blond haired woman whose reflection shows her to be a snake. She chose an etching style and hoped to convey the drama in most gothic art. It sure seems like a snake about to strike is pretty dramatic! 

    Part of a series of final projects for Ringling College of Art + Design.

    First-year Illustration major Saige Libertore was especially impressed with Romantic Gothicism in Arts in Context, especially that expressed in Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “Christabel.” This demonic tale of seduction told in verse features two female characters, the protagonist Christabel and the mysterious Geraldine. As you can see in Saige’s illustration, Geraldine is figured as the blond haired woman whose reflection shows her to be a snake. She chose an etching style and hoped to convey the drama in most gothic art. It sure seems like a snake about to strike is pretty dramatic! 

    — 4 months ago with 1 note
    #CA270  #samuel taylor coleridge  #Romantic Gothicism  #illustration  #final projects  #Ringling college of art and design 
    Part of my series of final projects at Ringling College of Art + Design.
For her final project in Classical Mythology in Literature, Art, and Music, 3rd-year Illustration major Erin Colleran decided to give Medusa a makeover to emphasize the gorgon as a “warrior baddass.” As Colleran wrote in her pitch, “She was once beautiful, and still is, though she has taken on more snakelike charms.” The outfit as designed above is intended to show her strength through armor. Her mid-section looks like a cross between a Greek gown and reptilian armor. Her main inspiration came from the work of Thierry Mulger. I can imagine this design actually being used in film or animation. 

    Part of my series of final projects at Ringling College of Art + Design.

    For her final project in Classical Mythology in Literature, Art, and Music, 3rd-year Illustration major Erin Colleran decided to give Medusa a makeover to emphasize the gorgon as a “warrior baddass.” As Colleran wrote in her pitch, “She was once beautiful, and still is, though she has taken on more snakelike charms.” The outfit as designed above is intended to show her strength through armor. Her mid-section looks like a cross between a Greek gown and reptilian armor. Her main inspiration came from the work of Thierry Mulger. I can imagine this design actually being used in film or animation. 

    — 4 months ago with 2 notes
    #poisoncircus  #360Myth  #Medusa  #final projects  #Ringling college of art and design  #Illustration 

    This post is in a series of final projects at Ringling College of Art + Design.

    For her final project in Arts in Context, 2nd year Motion Design major Jasmine Fernandez decided to adapt Surrealism to a short digital video. She stated that she wanted to capture the surreal in today’s world over a musique concréte-style soundtrack.

    — 4 months ago
    #surrealism  #Motion Design  #CA270  #Ringling college of art and design 
    Part of my series of final projects at Ringling College of Art + Design.
Vincenza Della Donna, a 3rd year Illustration major, took her inspiration from a line that Medusa sings in Jean-Baptiste Lully’s Persée (an opera we covered in Classical Mythology in Literature, Art and Music). By taking the lyrics “Happy is the fury that fills the universe with horror” and turning them into a typographic poster (using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop), Vincenza highlighted the gorgon’s anger at the injustice behind her monstrous transformation. Check out the way that all of the lettering is connected to represent the twisted nature of Medusa’s predicament (and, of course, the snakes) and the background of stone to represent the result of looking in the gorgon’s eyes.

    Part of my series of final projects at Ringling College of Art + Design.

    Vincenza Della Donna, a 3rd year Illustration major, took her inspiration from a line that Medusa sings in Jean-Baptiste Lully’s Persée (an opera we covered in Classical Mythology in Literature, Art and Music). By taking the lyrics “Happy is the fury that fills the universe with horror” and turning them into a typographic poster (using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop), Vincenza highlighted the gorgon’s anger at the injustice behind her monstrous transformation. Check out the way that all of the lettering is connected to represent the twisted nature of Medusa’s predicament (and, of course, the snakes) and the background of stone to represent the result of looking in the gorgon’s eyes.

    — 4 months ago
    #Medusa  #typography  #Ringling college of art and design  #360Myth 

    Part of my series of final projects at Ringling College of Art + Design.

    Graduating Motion Design senior Thomas Eyester created what he calls “Roboedipus” – a reconceptualization of Oedipus as a robot made of bronze, copper, unpolished gold, and polished iron. Tommy said he wanted to convey the fundamentally artificial form of Oedipus’s sorrow and suffering as was discussed in Classical Mythology in Literature, Art and Music. Here we see Oedipus’s blinding (top), his descent into Hades (middle), and his blind shame (bottom). Pretty dramatic stuff!

    — 4 months ago
    #360Myth  #Ringling college of art and design  #Oedipus Rex  #Motion Design  #final projects 
    Part of a series of final projects at Ringling College of Art + Design.
Like many students in Classical Mythology in Literature, Art, and Music, 3rd year Illustration student Andrea Espinosa (aka countandi) sought to disrupt the idea of Medusa as an ugly monster. For a series titled “Medusa in Manhattan,” Andi envisioned Medusa as beautiful with a boyfriend named Charlie. Even the heroic myth is flipped: Perseus is a bounty hunter that mercilessly pursues her when “all she wants is some peace and quiet in her life.” I think this project has serious potential. Andi stated, “I got inspired for this due to how villainized Medusa tends to be in most fiction nowadays […] Perseus is the jerk here and it’d be nice for the little weasel to get off her back, especially when she finally found a chance for love and is turning over a new leaf.” Rock on, Andi!

    Part of a series of final projects at Ringling College of Art + Design.

    Like many students in Classical Mythology in Literature, Art, and Music, 3rd year Illustration student Andrea Espinosa (aka countandi) sought to disrupt the idea of Medusa as an ugly monster. For a series titled “Medusa in Manhattan,” Andi envisioned Medusa as beautiful with a boyfriend named Charlie. Even the heroic myth is flipped: Perseus is a bounty hunter that mercilessly pursues her when “all she wants is some peace and quiet in her life.” I think this project has serious potential. Andi stated, “I got inspired for this due to how villainized Medusa tends to be in most fiction nowadays […] Perseus is the jerk here and it’d be nice for the little weasel to get off her back, especially when she finally found a chance for love and is turning over a new leaf.” Rock on, Andi!

    — 4 months ago with 1 note
    #360Myth  #medusa  #final projects  #illustration  #sequential art  #Ringling college of art and design 
    Part of my series of final projects for Ringling College of Art + Design.
Graduating senior in Photography and Digital Imaging Alyxandra Llano decided to convey Persephone’s descent into Hades for her final project in Classical Mythology in Literature, Art and Music. She stated that she was inspired by Stravinsky’s Perséphone and Rebecca Litchfield’s series Underworld Realm. Her goal was to make Hades’ realm “beautiful yet somber” and to show Persephone’s sense of longing. I think she succeeded.

    Part of my series of final projects for Ringling College of Art + Design.

    Graduating senior in Photography and Digital Imaging Alyxandra Llano decided to convey Persephone’s descent into Hades for her final project in Classical Mythology in Literature, Art and Music. She stated that she was inspired by Stravinsky’s Perséphone and Rebecca Litchfield’s series Underworld Realm. Her goal was to make Hades’ realm “beautiful yet somber” and to show Persephone’s sense of longing. I think she succeeded.

    — 4 months ago with 3 notes
    #360Myth  #Persephone  #final projects  #Ringling college of art and design  #Photography and Digital Imaging 

    Part of a series of final projects at Ringling College of Art + Design.

    For her final project in Classical Mythology in Literature, Art and Music2nd year Game Art and Design major Elisabeth-Rose Smith decided to create an alternative, multicultural Sphinx based on elements from India, Egypt, and Greece. She combined the black-footed cat with the Eurasian sparrowhawk to capture the mythological creature’s wily nature. She complemented her Sphinx with an environment design of a cave populated by Greek pottery and Egyptian jars as a potential source for her riddles. These students never disappoint when it comes to imaginative recreations!

    — 4 months ago with 1 note
    #360Myth  #Game art and Design  #Ringling college of art and design  #Sphinx